950 Madelyne Court, Santa Rosa (All images courtesy of Sotheby's International Realty)

950 Madelyne Court, Santa Rosa (All images courtesy of Sotheby’s International Realty)

Architecture is one of those interesting things that always has a name or time period to identify it with. But this unique home in the hills of Santa Rosa breaks that convention – I don’t have any other way to describe it outside of unique.

Set adjacent to Annadel State Park with a clear view of the Valley of the Moon, this home blurs the line between indoor and outdoor living. Though the current rainy conditions in Sonoma County may make outdoor living seem anything but attractive, the photos of this estate make the 3.9 acres it’s situated on look like a nature lovers dream come to life.

And it’s not just the oak trees and meadows that surround it, it’s the redwood and naturally sourced stone found throughout the interior, along with unexpected angles and surprising details. While I can’t pinpoint an exact style of architecture, I can say that it’s the use of outdoor space that feels like indoor space – and vice versa – that makes this home uncommon. So forget the fact that it’s raining right now and have a look:

950 Madelyne Court Santa Rosa – $3,900,000
4 beds, 4 baths, 4,793 square feet. Year built: 1979.

Front of house.

Front of house.

 

Approaching the house, I wasn’t so sure it was a home. It has a look that could be a grade school in the 1970’s, or a park office. But this is only at first glance.

Exterior of house.

Exterior of house in the backyard.

 

It’s when you go around the back that the 3.9 million asking price starts to make more sense.

Exterior of home.

Exterior of home.

 

Getting closer, you can see how the floor to ceiling glass walls are bridging the difference between outdoor and indoor space – while keeping out the rain and wind.

Entry hall.

Entry hall.

 

Entering into the house, it becomes apparent that wood is an important part of the overall look and feel. This may be to carry on with the feeling of the mature oaks surrounding the property.

Another view of the entryway.

Another view of the entryway.

 

This view shows off the custom skylight; the light planks of wood work well with the fogged glass. One could imagine the summer light being filtered through leaves; as though you’re on a hike in the forest.

Living room.

Living room.

 

This view of the living room illustrates what I mean by unexpected angles and the use of natural resources. I appreciate the ways the grain of the wood is set to complement the walls they’re creating. The continuance of the planks to create the coffered ceiling is almost too much at first, but after spending time in the room, it begins to makes sense.

Extended view of the living room.

Extended view of the living room.

 

Though the layout of the room is unexpected – it’s not a regular rectangle – it shows off the careful attention to detail used to make sure this room makes sense.

Living room.

Living room.

 

Another view of the living room.

Casual dining area.

Casual dining area.

 

This uniquely shaped casual dining area is a good example of the breakdown between inside/outside space.  I can imagine sitting to lunch here on a warm summer day with the doors open and not being able to tell if I was inside or outside.  Of course, that could just mean I need more sleep, but I do like the way this room is laid out.

Formal dining room.

Formal dining room.

 

In contrast to this formal dining room. The drapery and doors appear to be able to close the entire room in, erasing any idea of the outside when needed. After years of having an office career, I can’t help but think that as soon as you entered this room you’d be expected to give a presentation. It’s a lovely room, and the recessed ceiling is impressive, but give me the oak trees any day.

Kitchen.

Kitchen.

 

The kitchen is always my favorite room in any house, and the angles make it seem like a place that needs to be explored.

Kitchen.

Kitchen.

 

Another view of the kitchen.  This one shows how the shape of the island reflects the shape of the room.

Intimate eating area.

Intimate eating area.

 

This small, casual eating area has a table in the middle with a Lazy Susan – made for sharing a meal family-style. There’s another custom skylight, and a fireplace with locally sourced rock.  But the question at this point is: do you need three dining rooms in a 4 bedroom house?

Master bedroom.

Master bedroom.

 

…whether you do or not, this master bedroom with a panoramic view of the valley outside seems like a restful place to take a nap after indulging in just a bit too much Dim Sum.

View of the pool.

View of the pool.

 

When you get up from your nap, you’ll be rested enough to appreciate this view of the pool from one of the many windows…and realize you should probably go outside and get some exercise after that meal.

Master bathroom.

Master bathroom.

 

The master bathroom carries on with the interesting angles found throughout the house, though I’d have to say that the wallpaper is the first incongruous part of the decoration I’ve seen.

Guest room.

Guest room.

 

This guest room shows how much interior space this home has. With 4,793 square feet, I can’t imagine a single family would feel cramped.

Den/library.

Den/library.

 

This den/library has a feeling of an atrium, with the potted trees bringing the outside in once again.

Outdoor sitting area.

Outdoor sitting area.

 

This outdoor sitting area is a place to relax and enjoy the scenery; or give guests a place to socialize during an outdoor soiree.

Pool area.

Pool area.

 

From the seating area, the homeowner is afforded another view of the pool.

Decking.

Decking.

 

But if swimming isn’t on the agenda, well-placed decks can be found around the perimeter of the house, just right for an afternoon walk.

View from the house.

View from the house.

 

With a view like this, really, who would want to spend much time inside – no matter how nice the home?